Culture of Flat Bread Making of Iran (Persia)

Bread is one of the main dishes in Iranian gastronomy, and is made of wheat. The Archeological evidences, found in sites like Tepe Hesar in Damghan, showed the existence of wheat around 6-7 thousand years ago. In Avesta, Deron, a specific type of flat bread, has been mentioned that in ritual ceremonies were placed on a small Sofreh (a tablecloth that is widen on floor) as a sign of blessing and abundance.

Bread have always been the main food if Iranian, no matter who was the king or what dynasty had the reign.

According to written documents, after conquest of Iran, Arabs were acquainted with Iranian flatbread and called it Thin Enjoyment, this form of naming remained on the flatbread of Iran and for a time it was called Raqaq.  Bread have always been the main food if Iranian, no matter who was the king or what dynasty had the reign. The limitations of planting rice and the difficulty of its transportation to other sections of Iran, made bread even more popular.

Culture of Flat Bread Making of Iran (Persia)

Based on their technique of cooking, Iranian Bread is divided to the following sections.  Komaj Breads, Frying Pan Bread, Stone Bread like Sangak, Furnace (Tanūr) Breads like Taftoon and Lavash, and Pot Breads. Although different in style, they all are made with wheat flour. The size and type of bread was different due to geographical condition, lifestyle, as well as access to the wheat and its abundance. In old Iran, white bread were for noble and rich families and dark bread for the masses.

Culture of Flat Bread Making of Iran (Persia)

Today most of breads are cooked in industrial Tanūr (Furnace) in bakeries. Taftoon and Lavash are the most common breads of Iran. Since Taftoon is among thick breads, it is considered to have been invented before Lavash. Studies show that for specific times in Iran’s History, Taftoon was the main bread of commoners, but Lavash was popular among nobles and rich people, because it was thinner. The Culture of Flatbread Making and Sharing that as UNESCO describes it, involves at least three individual, had been inscribed by this organization in 2016, in a joint nomination file with Azerbaijan, Turkey, Kyrgyzstan, and Kazakhstan.