Located in the center of the country, Isfahan Province, neighbors Semnan, Qom, Markazi, Lorestan, Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari, Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad, Fars, Yazd and South Khorasan. The province is about 107018 square kilometers, and the sixth biggest province of the country. Isfahan has 24 districts with Khor, Biabank, Naien and Ardestan being the largest ones. About 6.5% of Iran’s population lives in Isfahan, and it is home to Armenians, Jews, and Georgians along with people from Isfahan and immigrants from other provinces. The language of people in this province is Farsi and its center is the city of Isfahan.

The place that today makes the Isfahan Province has a history that dates back to Elamite time. Isfahan was a part of Anshan, and the founding of the historical mound of Sialk proves that even before the Birth of Zoroaster, Iran had populated cities. After the Achaemenid, Parthian and Sassanid dynasties, the Muslim Arabs invaded the Isfahan, after which, Umayyad, Abbasid, and Mardavij (the founder of the Al-Ziar dynasty) seized and ruled it. For a time, Isfahan was the capital of Al-Ziar until the Buyid took the throne. Isfahan was once again the capital when Seljuk’s ruled, but fell to the hands of Mongols after their invasion. Isfahan’s zenith is the Safavid period, when the city drastically improved and developed, especially during the reign of Shah Abbas I, when he selected Isfahan as his capital.

Isfahan province has many natural and historical attractions, especially from the Safavid period. It annually attracts a large number of Iranian and foreign tourists. The cities of Isfahan, Kashan and Abyaneh are the most important tourist destinations in the province.

Isfahan province has many natural and historical attractions, especially from the Safavid period. It annually attracts a large number of Iranian and foreign tourists. The cities of Isfahan, Kashan and Abyaneh are the most important tourist destinations in the province. Festivals such as the extracting “Rose Water” festival in Qamsar and Niasar, and the Qālišuyān ritual of Mashhad Ardehal are some of its cultural attractions. Isfhan Province have some very beautiful attractions that are part of UNESCO World Heritage sites including, The Naghshe Jahan, the Jam-e Atiq Mosque, the Garden of Fine, and Garden of Chehel Sotoun. Beside all the attraction, Zayandehrud and its historical bridges are there to provide city with a unique sense, especially in the evening that people gather around the bridge and enjoy the river.

Isfahan province has long been considered as one of the major centers of artistic industry in Iran, and many fine art works are still produced here. In December 2015, Isfahan was registered as the Creative City of UNESCO for its craft and folk art. Carpet weaving, Copper engraving, Enamels, Khatam (similar to marquetry), Tiling, Turquoise dishes, Printing on Fabric, Aba making, Wood carving, and Silver making are the reasons of this registration. The most famous souvenirs of Isfahan are Gaz (type of sweet) and Poolak (type of Candy), which are made with various materials and shapes. Golab (rosewater) of Qamsar, and other vegetable extracts are also souvenirs of the province. The most famous traditional cuisine of Isfahan is called Biryani that is a type of barbecued meat. Yogurt stew, Halim (oat and wheat serial) with Milk, Halim with Eggplant, Kaljush, Ghaymeh-Rizeh (meatballs) and Ash Shul Qalamkar (kind of soup) as other native foods. The most prominent figures of this province are Sheikh Baha’i, Kamal al-Molk, Reza Abbasi, Jalil Shahnaz and Sohrab Sepehri.