Traditional Skills of Carpet Weaving in Kashan, Isfahan Province, Iran (Persia)

The city of Kashan, that is more than three-thousand-year-old, is nothing short of Isfahan in representing the perfection that is known as Persian Art. However, what the city is most famous for is the art of textile and carpet weaving. Kashan have always been a major center of carpet, and therefore, a center of sericulture. The objects from Sialk Historical Mound are witness to the advanced state of the fabric making of the prehistoric inhabitants of Kashan. The focus on this art continued in years that followed and turned Kashan to a city that equaled Isfahan in carpet and fabric even when Isfahan was experiencing its boom in Safavid time.

Persian Carpet, Iran (Persia)

Carpet Weaving is a difficult art that requires patience. The first step of making a carpet is choosing a pattern. The patterns are drawn over graph paper, each graph cell represents a knot in the carpet and by coloring them in different colors, the artist creates the shapes. The patterns are drawn in half or quarter of the original size and the weaver will make the whole carpet based on that. The usual patterns used in these carpets are the same as those used in Isfahan, such as Flower Vases, Altar, Hunting, Animals, Arabesque pattern, and Lachak Toranj.

In this style of weaving the colored wool that is used for weaving passes behind the first strand of wrap and then goes around the second linking the two strands in a knot.

After choosing the design or the pattern of the carpet, the weaving begins on the loom that is covered with strands of wool also known as wraps. The Kashan carpet is made by asymmetrical knots, a method of weaving that is called Farsi Weaving. In this style of weaving the colored wool that is used for weaving passes behind the first strand of wrap and then goes around the second linking the two strands in a knot. The number of knots in a square decimeter equals to 1600 to 1800 knots and the materials are usually wool and silk. UNESCO registered the method and technique used in this style of weaving as part of their Intangible Heritage list.